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Building with Nanomaterials | Innovation Workshop: Nanotechnology, Part 3
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Scientists use physical and chemical properties to describe and classify matter. Things like color, shape or texture can tell us about the matter and how that matter behaves. Well, nanotechnology isn't just exciting because it's small but also because of the new properties that emerge. From airplanes to baseball bats, nanomaterials offer a variety of desirable properties such as strength and conductivity. Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes are wonder materials both made entirely from carbon atoms. Innovation Workshop explores their structure of matter and how engineers can build with these new materials.

For more information: http://www.fcps.edu/fairfaxnetwork/innovation_nanotechnology/index.html
Twitter @FFXNetwork

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Fairfax County Public Schools
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Fairfax Network
Inside the NanoFab | Innovation Workshop: Nanotechnology, Part 5
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Innovation Workshop Student Reporter shows a sneak peek into the National Institute for Standards and Technology’s NanoFab where scientists work in a clean room to build highly structured circuits. Nanoelectronics is how we use nanotechnology to build electronics with nanoscale features. And it’s a field of study where researchers are still creating new methods to build.

For more information: http://www.fcps.edu/fairfaxnetwork/innovation_nanotechnology/index.html
Twitter @FFXNetwork

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Lecture
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Fairfax County Public Schools
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Fairfax Network
Inside the TechConnect World Innovation Conference | Innovation Workshop: Nanotechnology
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Innovation Workshop Student Reporter Kurien attended the TechConnect World Innovation conference in Washington DC to see how business is driving innovation. Nanotechnology has the potential to impact all areas of our lives.

For more information: http://www.fcps.edu/fairfaxnetwork/innovation_nanotechnology/index.html
Twitter @FFXNetwork

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Lecture
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Fairfax County Public Schools
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Fairfax Network
Seeing Small  | Innovation Workshop: Nanotechnology, Part 2
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Nanotechnology is an innovation with big potential even though it’s small in size. So small, it can’t be seen with the human eye or even your school’s microscope. In 1981, the Scanning Tunneling Microscope was invented and launched the age of nanotechnology. It can see individual atoms and even move them to create advanced nanostructures. Through an interview with Joseph Stroscio at the National Institute for Standards and Technology, students will learn about moving atoms, electron clouds and how temperature effects matter.

For more information: http://www.fcps.edu/fairfaxnetwork/innovation_nanotechnology/index.html
Twitter @FFXNetwork

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Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Fairfax County Public Schools
Provider Set:
Fairfax Network
#SugarChallenge | Innovation Workshop: Nanotechnology, Part 4
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#SugarChallenge! One of the cool things about nanotechnology is that there’s more surface area and more places for chemical reactions. It’s powdered sugar versus granulated sugar to experience the difference in surface area.

For more information: http://www.fcps.edu/fairfaxnetwork/innovation_nanotechnology/index.html
Twitter @FFXNetwork

Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Fairfax County Public Schools
Provider Set:
Fairfax Network
What is Nano? | Innovation Workshop: Nanotechnology, Part 1
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How small is small? And how can nanoscale matter improve our lives? Innovation Workshop: Nanotechnology explores this cutting-edge science and engineering of nanoscale matter. Nanotechnology involves manipulating and controlling matter from one nanometer to 100 nanometers. Just think, even a single sheet of newspaper is 100,000 nanometers thick. So, this technology is itty, bitty and teeny, tiny. Human DNA, the flu virus that makes you sick and molecules are all on the nanoscale.

For more information: http://www.fcps.edu/fairfaxnetwork/innovation_nanotechnology/index.html
Twitter @FFXNetwork

Subject:
Technology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Fairfax County Public Schools
Provider Set:
Fairfax Network