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  • Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
The History of Public Health
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In the History of Public Health we will examine the historical experience of health and illness from a population perspective. This material seeks to reveal how the organization of societies facilitates or mitigates the production and transmission of disease. It also asks how do populations and groups of individuals go about securing their health? One key theme is the medical management of space in one form or another - from the public space of the environment through institutional spaces such as schools and workplaces to personal/individual body space. The progression of the lectures reflects this, working "inwards" from the environment to individuals. The content provides an historical interpretation of how the theory and practice of public health in today's world has come to be what it is. We will concentrate primarily on the modern world (i.e., 1750 onwards) and omit detailed examination of public health in antiquity and the middle ages, although these time periods will be alluded to frequently. A thematic rather than chronological structure will be adopted so that comparisons can be made across the centuries and between different parts of the globe.

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Student Guide
Syllabus
Provider:
AMSER: Applied Math and Science Education Repository
Internet Scout Project
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Provider Set:
AMSER: Applied Math and Science Education Repository
Internet Scout Project
JHSPH OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mooney, Graham
Mooney, Graham
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Methods in Biostatistics I
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Presents fundamental concepts in applied probability, exploratory data analysis, and statistical inference, focusing on probability and analysis of one and two samples. Topics include discrete and continuous probability models; expectation and variance; central limit theorem; inference, including hypothesis testing and confidence for means, proportions, and counts; maximum likelihood estimation; sample size determinations; elementary non-parametric methods; graphical displays; and data transformations.

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Mathematics
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Syllabus
Provider:
AMSER: Applied Math and Science Education Repository
Internet Scout Project
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Provider Set:
AMSER: Applied Math and Science Education Repository
Internet Scout Project
JHSPH OpenCourseWare
Author:
Caffo, Brian
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Problem Solving for Immunization Programs
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Countries around the world - even those at war - are collaborating to ensure that children under the age of five don't die from diseases for which vaccines are available. In the past twenty years, global vaccine coverage has surpassed eighty percent, and a second disease, polio, is nearly eradicated. In the United States, coverage rates are even higher, and vaccine-preventable diseases are now rare. Never have so many resources been focused on immunization - yet problems remain. Additional, highly effective vaccines have been developed but still do not reach the majority of children. More worrisome, currently high immunization rates may be unsustainable for a number of reasons. This material will cover immunization basics and survey the public health, sociological, and economic literature, identifying and analyzing common problems using a standard problem-solving approach. Topics will span developed and developing countries and will include vaccine-delivery strategies, program management and supervision, epidemiological surveillance, community participation, and disease eradication. Students will analyze actual vaccination data using the U.S. Center for Disease Control's CASA software program. Once you've completed the course, you should have gained the necessary tools to identify and formulate innovative solutions to common problems faced by immunization program managers and policymakers.

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Simulation
Syllabus
Provider:
AMSER: Applied Math and Science Education Repository
Internet Scout Project
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Provider Set:
AMSER: Applied Math and Science Education Repository
Internet Scout Project
JHSPH OpenCourseWare
Author:
McQuestion, Michael
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Statistical Reasoning I
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Statistical Reasoning in Public Health provides an introduction to selected important topics in biostatistical concepts and reasoning through lectures, exercises, and bulletin board discussions. It represents an introduction to the field and provides a survey of data and data types. Specific topics include tools for describing central tendency and variability in data; methods for performing inference on population means and proportions via sample data; statistical hypothesis testing and its application to group comparisons; issues of power and sample size in study designs; and random sample and other study types. While there are some formulae and computational elements to the course, the emphasis is on interpretation and concepts.

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Internet Scout Project
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Provider Set:
Internet Scout Project
JHSPH OpenCourseWare
Author:
McGready, John
McGready, John
Date Added:
02/16/2011