Search Results (10)

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Chipmunk eating
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Chipmunks stuff small plants and insects into their cheeks when they feed. Skunks and coyotes hunt the small mammals.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
National Park Service
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Katie Hale (CSUF;Biological Sciences)
Coyote (Canis latrans)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Coyotes are top consumers in any food web, meaning they eat primary producers (plants) and consumers such as insects, spiders, toads, small mammals (chipmunks, skunks, and mice), and large mammals (deer). No animals eat coyotes, except maybe the occasional human.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
National Park Service
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Katie Hale (CSUF;Biological Sciences)
The Disappearing Dark Sky
Rating

In this online interactive, learners investigate "The Case of the Disappearing Dark Sky." Learners discover how human development leads to fewer visible stars as well as the effects of light glare on animal migration patterns. Learners also experiment with choosing different lighting features to produce the least amount of light pollution.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
National Park Service
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
Best Buy Children's Foundation
National Park Service
Moth using proboscis to get food from flower
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Not only bees pollinate flowers. Moths have a specialized mouth structure called a proboscis that is used to extract nectar and pollinate the flower. The moth benefits by getting food and the flower benefits by being pollinated.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
National Park Service
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton;Student, Biological Sciences)
Name That Park
Rating

In this online interactive, learners are introduced to the basic function of Geographic Information System (GIS) maps in relation to national parks. Recognizable park boundaries are presented and learners are given the option to add layers such as lakes, rivers and visitor centers, until the learner is able to identify the park map from a list of choices.

Subject:
Ecology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
National Park Service
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
National Park Service
Reading a Map
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this online interactive, learners investigate how Earth's three-dimensional, physical environment is represented on a two-dimensional topographic map. Learners explore the essential parts of a map including legend, scale, and slope indicators. Map reading skills are then tested by learners choosing the best trail to take in different scenarios.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
National Park Service
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
Best Buy Children's Foundation
National Park Service
Rock Around The Park
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this online interactive, learners create timelines by placing images of various landforms in order to depict the effects of erosion over time. Learners are introduced to the process of erosion, different types of rock formations including mesas, buttes, and spires, and the erosive progression of natural arches and canyons.

Subject:
Geoscience
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Provider:
National Park Service
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
Best Buy Children's Foundation
National Park Service
Scorpion anatomy
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

One reason why scorpions are considered to be arachnids is because they have eight legs. The pedipalps (claws) are not considered legs since they don't help the scorpion walk or maneuver. The telson, or tail, has a stinging barb on it that injects venom into the scorpion's prey or enemy.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
National Park Service
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
N/A N/A (National Park Service;)
The effect of acid rain on a leaf
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Acid rain falls on leaves and is taken in through the stomata. The chemicals cause the leaf tissue to die prematurely.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
National Park Service
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton;Student, Biological Sciences)