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Under the Rotating Sunspot (Layers 0, 1, 2)
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Using the SOHO Michelson Doppler Interferometer (MDI), scientists can use a process ...

Using the SOHO Michelson Doppler Interferometer (MDI), scientists can use a process called Time-Distance helioseismology to determine temperatures and fluid flows under the surface of the Sun.

Provider:
NASA
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Alexander Kosovichev
Junwei Zhao
Tom Bridgman
Temperature and Flows under a Sunspot (Layers 0, 2, 4)
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Using the SOHO Michelson Doppler Interferometer (MDI), scientists can use a process ...

Using the SOHO Michelson Doppler Interferometer (MDI), scientists can use a process called Time-Distance helioseismology to determine temperatures and fluid flows under the surface of the Sun.

Provider:
NASA
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Alexander Kosovichev
Junwei Zhao
Tom Bridgman
Polar: PIXIE at T055798 on May 11, 1999 at 05:05
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On May 11, 1999, the solar wind that blows constantly from the ...

On May 11, 1999, the solar wind that blows constantly from the Sun virtually disappeared. Dropping to a small fraction of its normal density and to half its normal speed, the solar wind died down enough to allow physicists to observe particles flowing directly from the Suns corona to Earth. This severe change in the solar wind also drastically changed the shape of Earths magnetic field and produced a rare auroral display at Earths North Pole.

Provider:
NASA
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
David Chenette
Greg Shirah
John Sigwarth
Mike Carlowicz
Supernova Remnant SNR 0509 Lithograph and In Search of... Supernova Remnants Classroom Activity
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This Hubble Space Telescope image shows what appears to be a delicate ...

This Hubble Space Telescope image shows what appears to be a delicate bubble of gas floating in space. In actuality, the bubble is the visible remnant of a powerful supernova explosion called SNR 0509. The bubble was formed from gas being swept up by the expanding shock wave. The accompanying activity is a curriculum support tool designed for use as an introductory inquiry activity. In the activity, students use the images and text on this lithograph to generate questions about supernova explosions and remnants. They will conduct research to answer their questions, and create a presentation to demonstrate their understanding of the material, providing supporting evidence from their research.

Subject:
Chemistry
Physics
Geoscience
Space Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Provider:
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA Earth and Space Science Reviewed Collection
Polar: PIXIE at T055798 on May 11, 1999 at 22:55
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On May 11, 1999, the solar wind that blows constantly from the ...

On May 11, 1999, the solar wind that blows constantly from the Sun virtually disappeared. Dropping to a small fraction of its normal density and to half its normal speed, the solar wind died down enough to allow physicists to observe particles flowing directly from the Suns corona to Earth. This severe change in the solar wind also drastically changed the shape of Earths magnetic field and produced a rare auroral display at Earths North Pole.

Provider:
NASA
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
David Chenette
Greg Shirah
John Sigwarth
Mike Carlowicz
Earth Rotation from Galileo Imagery: 1 x Real-Time
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This animation is one in a series created to show an accurate ...

This animation is one in a series created to show an accurate representation of the Earths rotation at different temporal resolutions. The animation is created from images taken by the Galileo spacecraft during a close pass of the Earth on December 11-12, 1990. The animations range from real-time, in which no rotation can be perceived, to 3600 times real-time, in which both the Earths rotation and cloud motion can bee seen. The series also includes an animation in which the Earths rotation has been halted so that cloud motion is easier to see and an animation showing the specific amount of rotation that takes place in three minutes.

Provider:
NASA
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Doug Norton
Horace Mitchell
AMSR-E Anomalous Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature Data Used to Forecast 2003 Hurricane Season 1
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Researchers and forecasters often study sea surface temperatures for an indication of ...

Researchers and forecasters often study sea surface temperatures for an indication of hurricane potential. Scientists say above normal Atlantic Ocean temperatures is one reason for the "above normal" hurricane forecast. Hurricanes convert heat from the tropical atmosphere and oceans to wind and waves, just as a car engine converts gasoline into motion. These animations show a year in the life of global ocean temperatures, June 2, 2002 to May 11, 2003. Green indicates the coolest water, yellow the warmest. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on the Aqua satellite saw through the clouds to provide sea surface temperatures.

Provider:
NASA
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
David Adamec
Lori Perkins
Landsat 7 Looks at Coral Reefs: (1 of 2)
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Coral forms off shore from volcanic islands in tropical latitudes, developing a ...

Coral forms off shore from volcanic islands in tropical latitudes, developing a barrier reef thats separated by a growing lagoon. But over time, while the surrounding ocean wears away the main body of the island, the coral ring remains.

Provider:
NASA
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Serge Andrefouet
Stuart Snodgrass
Hurricane Erin from SeaWiFS: September 10, 2001 (Version 1)
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The SeaWiFS instrument captured this beautiful image of Hurricane Erin on September ...

The SeaWiFS instrument captured this beautiful image of Hurricane Erin on September 10, 2001. The image shows the eye to be located 200 kilometers due east of Bermuda.

Provider:
NASA
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Gene Feldman
Stuart Snodgrass
Comparing EO-1-Hyperions spectral resolution to Landsat
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The Landsat system covers 7 spectral bands (of which six are shown ...

The Landsat system covers 7 spectral bands (of which six are shown here) while the Hyperion instrument records data in 220 bands from 353 nanometers to 2577 nanometers. This animation shows how they stack up.

Provider:
NASA
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Lawrence Ong
Stephen Ungar
Tom Bridgman
Aerosols and Warming Change with Time: Version 1
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As the aerosol content and solar heating change with time, the atmosphere ...

As the aerosol content and solar heating change with time, the atmosphere and the Earths surface experience different warming and cooling. This animation displays a time series of the INDOEX region with 8-day averages showing aerosol and solar reflectance (albedo) data from the Terra satellite From these, we see how these inputs generate warming of the atmosphere (Atmospheric Forcing - red regions) and cooling of the surface (Surface Forcing - dark regions). Areas of missing data (due to clouds, etc.) are either black or transparent.

Provider:
NASA
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Anand Inamdar
Tom Bridgman
Veerabhadran Ramanathan
Modeled Arctic Sea Ice Thickness from 1940 through 2060: View #1
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Part of the ongoing research into polar ice trends encompasses evaluation from ...

Part of the ongoing research into polar ice trends encompasses evaluation from sophisticated computer models. At the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory at Princeton University, run by NASAs sibling agency, NOAA, researchers modeled a 5,000 year period to see how polar ice might behave over time depending on several different variables. This visualization shows a 120-year slice of that complete model, essentially offering a research window on to experimental processes that require longer time frames than human lifetimes. According to the model shown here, projecting a period from 1940 to 2060, there is evidence to suggest human factors have had a measurable effect on Arctic ice decreases.

Provider:
NASA
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Tom BiddlecomeKeith Dixon
An Introduction to the Next Generation Science Standards Webinar 1
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This video is the first installment in the GLOBE Program's webinar series ...

This video is the first installment in the GLOBE Program's webinar series on the basics of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). The series focuses on how GLOBE teaching resources are aligned to the standards. Webinar 1 explains NGSS Conceptual Shifts 1 (Science Education Should Reflect the Interconnected Nature of Science as it is Practiced and Experienced in the Real World) and 2 (The Next Generation Science Standards are student performance expectations - NOT curriculum).

Subject:
Education
Geoscience
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
UCAR Staff
University Corporation for Atmospheric Research
Provider Set:
The GLOBE Collection
The GLOBE Collection
Author:
The GLOBE Program
US1 Flyover of the Florida Keys
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The structure and extent of coral reefs can now, for the first ...

The structure and extent of coral reefs can now, for the first time, be monitored globally, thanks to new observations from NASAs Landsat 7 spacecraft. Detailed images of reefs from nearly 900 locations around the world have been collected in the first year of the Landsat 7 mission.

Provider:
NASA
UCAR
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Serge Andrefouet
Stuart Snodgrass