Search Results (943)

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  • Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Abundant green plants on the forest floor
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Green plants make their own food by a process called photosynthesis. They also use nutrients and water from the soil to grow. Primary consumers (insects, chipmunks, mice and deer) eat green plants.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
U.S. Department of Transportation
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Katie Hale (CSUF;Biological Sciences)
Acid in water
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Plants and animals that live in water create some amount of acid in the water. The carbon dioxide that plants and animals release into the water makes the water acidic and unsafe for living organisms. This is why the water of captive aquatic animals and plants must be changed often.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
California State University, Fullerton
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Laszlo Ilyes (None;)
Acid test
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Baking soda can be used as an indicator of how much acid a substance contains. Lemons and limes have more acid in them than grapefruits and oranges. Indophenol can be used as an indicator of how much vitamin C is in a substance.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Purdue University
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Olivia Worland (Purdue University;Biological Sciences)
Adaptations in the intertidal zone
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In the intertidal zone organisms are exposed to periods of varying moisture, sunlight, and wave forces. Many organisms have specialized structures or behaviors that allow them to live in this constantly changing and often harsh environment.

Subject:
Life Science
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
California State University, Fullerton
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton;Student, Biological Sciences)
Adult Artemia blood circulation
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Artemia adult's blood circulation in the tail and appendages.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Purdue University
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Mildred Hoover (Salem State College;Biology Department)
Nancy Pelaez (Purdue University;Biological Sciences)
Adult Monarch butterfly
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The Monarch butterfly is an insect and has six legs and two sets of wings. The butterfly drinks using a straw-like mouth structure.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Texas State University
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton;Student, Biological Sciences)
Adult beetle
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

After entering the pupal stage, the adult darkling beetle will emerge. The beetles can then mate and lay eggs, which will hatch into mealworm larvae.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
California State University, Fullerton
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
N/A N/A (None;)
Adult butterfly anatomy
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The butterfly can fly around using its wings and sees where it is going through its eyes. The spiracles allow the butterfly to breathe and the legs are what it uses to walk or crawl around on. The antennae help the butterfly know where it is going. The proboscis is what the butterfly uses to drink nectar from flowers.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
California State University, Fullerton
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Shannon Murphy (Earth's Birthday Project;Program Development)
Adult darkling beetle
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The female adult darkling beetle lays hundreds of eggs that eventually hatch into tiny mealworms (larval stage). Darkling beetles do not have live births.

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Arizona State University
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton;Student, Biological Sciences)
Adult frog
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The adult frog now lives on land and has nostrils and lungs to breathe air. It also has front and hind legs to hop around on. This frog can start the life cycle over again by laying eggs and reproducing.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
California State University, Fullerton
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Harmen Piekema (None;)
Adult milkweed bug
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Once milkweed bugs have grown into adults, they can mate and lay eggs. They tend to lay eggs on soft, protective material.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
California State University, Fullerton
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Bruce J Marlin (None;)
Adult zebra fish in a tank
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The adult zebra fish is the final stage in the zebra fish life cycle. At this point, the adult can lay eggs and a male zebra fish will fertilize them.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
California State University, Fullerton
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton;Student, Biological Sciences)
Aerial view of a city
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

When a city is built, habitat and most organisms living in it are killed or forced to flee. Cities use a lot of energy and water and create a tremendous amount of waste and runoff. Development is the biggest source of pollution.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
USGS
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton;Student, Biological Sciences)
Alchemy: Distillation
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Science in its earliest beginnings consisted of a practice called alchemy. Alchemy includes the study of chemistry, biology, astronomy, spirituality, physics, and art. Distillation or experiments in purification of substances may have been a part of the practice of alchemy.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
California State University, Fullerton
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
N/A N/A (None;)
Algae on a rock in the intertidal zone
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Algae are a collection of a millions of photosynthetic protists. These algae are red because of a special pigment. They cement themselves onto rocks in moist areas.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
California State University, Fullerton
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton;Student, Biological Sciences)
Algal bloom in a lake in Tennessee
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Large amounts of nutrients from agricultural runoff and pollution cause increased growth of algae. Algal blooms cause other organisms to die because the algae uses up all the oxygen in the water to grow. Eventually, this body of water will have no life in it.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
USGS
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton;Student, Biological Sciences)
Algal blooms
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Algae are producers. This means that they make their own energy and food and do not need to eat other organisms to gain energy and live. Algae use the sun, water, and carbon dioxide to go through photosynthesis and make their own energy to grow, bloom, and reproduce.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
California State University, Fullerton
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
N/A N/A (None;)
Algal cell
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This red algal cell (Chlamydomonas nivalis) gives mountain snow packs a red tint. It uses the pollutants in snow as food. It cannot be seen without a microscope.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
USDA-ARS
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
N/A N/A (USDA;ARS)
Alligator weed
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Alligator weed is a non-native species of plant in the United States that can damage waterways by clogging them and reducing water flow. Also, it grows in a way that reduces light penetration into the water. Alligator weed is being reduced by a few different insects that were released as biological control agents, such as the alligator weed flea beetle.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
USDA-NRCS
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Robert H. Mohlenbrock (USDA-NRCS;)
Aluminum can
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Aluminum cans can be recycled to reduce waste commonly found on roadsides. This will help reduce the amount of energy companies put out to make new cans as well.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
California State University, Fullerton
Video and Image Data Access (VIDA) Collection
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Jon Sullivan (None;)